Alan Pringle

Pop culture. Chocolate. Technology. Doughnuts.

Tag: 1960s (page 2 of 2)

Opening titles from the 1963 film Wheels of TragedyNothing like seeing bloody, mangled bodies on the highway to make high school students drive safely!

I suspect that was the thought process of those who made the 1963 drivers education film, Wheels of Tragedy. The movie staged reenactments of what occurred before auto accidents and then showed real footage of wrecked cars and dead people.

The film was already more than 20 years old when I saw it in the mid 1980s during my drivers ed class, and its cheese factor had ripened further with age. The cars and technology were already very outdated, and to call the people in the reenactments actors would be an exaggeration. The wooden acting is about as offensive as using the dead to teach teenagers a lesson.

See for yourself (carnage isn’t shown until the 9-minute mark):

(If you can’t see the preceding Google video, you can watch Wheels of Tragedy on YouTube.)

Today’s special guest star on Dark Shadows: the teleprompter in the doorway

The gothic soap Dark Shadows (1966–1971) is well known for broadcasting major goofs: flies landing on actors’ heads, scenery falling down, and lines horribly flubbed. Now that Netflix is streaming many episodes, you can relive the hilarity yourself. I had a good laugh when a technician rolled a teleprompter into the doorway of a hospital room set:

Teleprompter shown in scene from Dark Shadows

Image from Episode 235 of Dark Shadows (copyright Dan Curtis Productions)

Twice in the episode, you see the teleprompter glide into the doorway because actors are about to step out of the room for a “private” conversation. Was the teleprompter paid scale for its appearances?

 

Fancy franks

I admit it. I’m a hot dog hater. Even as a child, I would not eat them.

Seeing bright red wieners covered in an apricot glaze has not improved my viewpoint on hot dogs, either:

Bright-red Hawaiian wieners. No thanks!

The Better Homes & Gardens Barbecues and Picnics cookbook (1963) can call them “fancy franks” and even pair them with yummy grilled pineapple, but I still ain’t eating them.

 

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